Public Health? Don’t Drink the Kool-Aid

ABA Close UpDe do do do, de da da da. Entering the Brooklyn subway on a sunny day. But what’s this? A public health message? Move in closer….img_1921

Okay, I see. Big Soda is paying the MTA to endear us to their products, disguised of healthful advice. This ad is sponsored by the group that represents Coke, Pepsi and Dr. Pepper. (I miss Mayor Bloomberg.)
Public Health Indeed!

That was fours days ago. Then. today I woke up to this article in the New York Times: Coke and Pepsi Give Millions to Public Health, Then Lobby Against it. Ah, the public health part.

But these articles, also ripped from today’s headlines, put another spin on “public health”:

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (“The Academy”), the professional organization of registered dietitians in which I once held leadership positions, accepts (a lot of) sponsorship from Big Food. That’s why I am no longer a member. They have sullied my name and so they must be renounced. My dietitian friends will tell you, the phrase “The Academy” always evokes the response, “I hate them.”

Personally, I favor a soda tax (and everything else that can be done to reform our sick brand Capitalism.) I neither drink soda nor eat processed food. (Bread is about as processed as it gets.) I’ve written about why I favor a soda tax in the blog posts listed below.

Your thoughts: How can we stop this?

Serves 3 Over Ice – NICE!

There are some things we would rather forget and I’ll bet Coke would like to forget this.This picture was taken from a poster at the New World of Coca-Cola Museum in Atlanta. Judging by the outfit and decor, it is nearly 60 years old. It was included in a recent presentation by the New York City Department of Health in support of Mayor Bloomberg’s “Maximum Size for Sugary Drinks: Proposed Amendment of Article 81.”

Mike Bloomberg wants to ban the sale at restaurants, food carts, movie theaters, and concession stands at sports arenas of any cup or bottle of sweetened drink larger than 16 ounces. Bloomberg says the proposed ban is a way to fight obesity in New York City, but opponents say that soda is unfairly singled-out as the cause of a multidimensional problem. In fact, the premise that soda causes obesity is unproven. The most that can be said comes from the CDC: “Sugar drinks have been linked to poor diet quality, weight gain, obesity, and, in adults, type 2 diabetes. U.S. dietary guidelines issued in 2010 recommend limiting the consumption of foods and beverages with added sugars.” Save them for a special occasion.

Many people dislike Mayor Bloomberg’s healthier-than-thou arrogance, but I like his attention-getting style. But whether you are for or against the mayor’s proposal, the poster shows that even Coke agreed a “big” 16-ounce soda is enough for three people. His proposal is simply a handy reminder that today’s food portions are out of control. Presently in NYC, you can’t even buy a soda that is smaller than 16 ounces — not even on the kid’s menu; 16 ounces is usually the “small” size, while 32 to 64 ounces is the “large.” Studies show that when people are given larger portions, they simply eat more without realizing it. It is especially true when it comes to beverages. This quote from Michelle Obama’s address to the National Restaurant Association Meeting in 2012 is a good one. She said, “…no matter what you do, it’s important, truly important, to keep portion sizes in check, because we all know that the size of a meal is just as important as the ingredients it’s made of.” And so, next time you see a 16-ounce soda, remember that it “serves 3 over ice – nice!” Coca-Cola said so in writing. Ouch.

Your thoughts: Where do you stand on the 16-ounce sweetened drink limit?